Is cure to coronavirus hidden in Viagra


When Viagra was discovered in the United States two decades ago, it was much debated. This drug that removes sexual impotence in men has been called a kind of revolution.


Given its effects, it was compared to the effects of the discovery of the contraceptive pill.


But did you know that the Pfizer company that made it designed it to facilitate blood flow to the heart?


Low blood flow to the heart causes pain, which is called angina. When Viagra was medically tested, interesting effects were seen. This began to create a state of excitement in the body of men


Use of Viagra


Following the conclusion that it is similar to other drugs for controlling heart problems, the researchers decided to stop working on it.


But when he learned of the side effects of Viagra, he decided to continue his research.


Viagra is now used not only to treat sexual dysfunction in men but also small amounts for heart-related blood problems.


This drug is available in the market under the name of Revitive.


This is an interesting example of the fact that the purposes for which a drug is formulated are sometimes useful for another disease.



Medications such as thiophene


Experts say it has many benefits. Many drugs have been tested in recent days in connection with the discovery of the Code 19 vaccine.


These include drugs such as chloroquine and its associated Hydroxychloroquine, Remdesivir and beta-Aytrfyrun. But the question now is how effective these drugs, which are not made for coronavirus, can be.When has this method been used successfully and what are its benefits?


Save time


This process is called drug repositioning. Experts point to time savings as the biggest benefit of this process.

Munir Pir Mohammad, a professor of clinical and molecular pharmacology at the University of Liverpool in the UK, told that the process saves time.


He says: "When a drug is made from scratch, it is first prepared in a laboratory and then its effects on cells are tested and then its clinical study is done. It has to go through many more processes before it can be tested on humans.


"After that, it has to go through a lot of licensing. This process can take 10 to 17 years. Given the current crisis in Corona, it will take at least five years for the drug to hit the market, even if we show great speed in our approach. We don't have that much time yet. "


Medical examination

Professor Munir Pir Mohammad adds: 'The biggest benefit of drug recovery is that the drug has been tested on humans, so there is a database of how it works. she does. The only thing to know is whether it is useful for the treatment of a particular disease or not.


However, Pir Mohammad makes it clear that medical tests are necessary before giving them directly to humans because there is no guarantee that it will work or not. How effective it is in different situations can only be determined by a medical examination.


save money


As well as saving time, this process also saves money.


Ian Moloney, a professor of pharmacology at the Murdoch University in Australia, says: "A pharmaceutical company spends 2 billion on a new drug that takes years to reach the market."


Developing a new drug is a more expensive bargain than the previous one.


Professor Ian Moloney says: 'The patent on a drug expires after a certain period. Although the case varies, the patent usually lasts up to 20 years after the drug is registered.


Once that period is over, any company can make and sell the drug.


The first success in such an experiment was aspirin.


The drug has been used for more than a century to relieve pain but is now used in small doses in some patients to reduce the risk of a heart attack.


And now new research has shown that it can also be effective in preventing certain types of cancer.



New use of old medicines


Another important example is the drug thalidomide. The drug was developed by the German pharmaceutical company Greenthal in the 1950s and 1960s.


The drug was developed to prevent dizziness in pregnant women during the first three months.


The drug was withdrawn from the market in the early 1960s because of its effects on more than 10,000 babies after birth.


Decades later, when it was repositioned, it was found to be effective in treating bone marrow cancer and leprosy.


Earlier, these drugs were found to be effective in any disease by chance, but after deliberation, the practice of drug reposing became common

.

Blessings in coincidence?


However, advances in technology in recent years have made this possible.


Bruce Bloom, director of the American NGO Cures with Reach, told "In the age of vast data and artificial intelligence, deliberately reposing medicine has become easier."

If you choose medicine carefully, as is the case with Code 19, how do you decide which medicine to choose?


In the case of Corona, drugs that were developed for other viruses, such as remedies, were the first to be selected.


The drug was designed to treat Ebola but had a negative effect.


On what basis is the decision to choose medicine made?


Sometimes medicines that are not for the virus are antiviral.


Pir Mohammad says there are many criteria used to select medicines.


"It's not like a magic wand," he said. This can have some side effects, such as in the case of remediation and can save you from going to the hospital. But he can't recover completely. "


The biggest problem with drug repositioning is that the market is not interested in it.


Bloom says the process is not commercially encouraged, which is why repositioning is not supported in the early stages.


It costs less and that is why it is important. If the company does not see a profit, it avoids repositioning.

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